Case Studies

The below case studies show the mining check report and the full non-coal mining search on areas where known issues of subsidence or sinkholes have occured.


Derby (Foolow) Sink Hole

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As reported in the national press in December 2013.
At 130ft deep and 160ft wide this sinkhole appeared in the village of Foolow in Derbyshire. It is thought the area was part of the old Mill Dam Lead Mine near Buxton. There are old mine workings directly below the sinkhole with huge cavities left, where the old mine was extracting lead centuries ago.


Egremont mine shaft collapse

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As reported by the BBC in 2012.
An 80ft (25m) deep hole has opened up in a West Cumbria street after a disused mine shaft collapsed. The area was used extensively for iron ore mining. Karl Connor, from Copeland Borough Council, said: "There are a number of mine shafts in the area, throughout West Cumbria. Where we find these shafts, where we're aware of them, work goes on to fix them. Unfortunately I don't think everybody's aware of them all."


Carmarthen collapsed Lead Mine

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As reported in the Mail Online in 2016.
A 10 metre X 10 metre sinkhole opened up just metres from homes.The hole swallowed up part of the ground underneath a shed and spread out so far it came close to a bungalow. It opened up at the Towy View Park, near Carmarthen, South Wales, built on the site of an old lead mine.


High Wycombe sinkhole

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As reported in the Guardian in 2014.
A nine-metre-deep (30ft) sinkhole opened up in the driveway of a house and swallows car as a result of a poorly documented chalk mine.


Plumstead ancient chalk mine collapse.

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As reported in This is London in 2016.
The 5m deep sinkhole opened up on the doorstep of a newly-built home in Brickfield Cottages. Hexagon Housing described it as a sinkhole, but archaeologists disagree, and instead have argued that the crater was caused by a mining collapse in the South Metropolitan Mine used in the 18th and 19th centuries below Brickfield Cottages.